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UNITED KINGDOM: ISIS Fighter Who Beheaded 100+ People, Claimed $13,000 in Benefits Captured

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Another terrorist has been revealed to have claimed welfare at the UK taxpayer’s expense–while overseas committing acts of atrocity.

Belgian ‘native,’ Anouar Haddouchi, who lived in Birmingham, UK was captured and placed in a Syrian prison by Kurdish and Arab forces.

Haddouchi, dubbed the ‘executioner of Raqqa,’ is believed to have beheaded over one hundred people and to have claimed around $13,000 in welfare benefits while in the Middle East.

Haddouchi moved to Birmingham–a UK city with high levels of radical Islamic activity–from Belgium, in 2009.

In 2015, he traveled to Syria to fight for ISIS.

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It is thought that the benefits money claimed was spent by ISIS.

Around $4,000 of the swindled money is believed to have been handed to Mohamed Abrini–the mastermind behind the November 2015 Paris attacks and 2016 Brussels bombings.

The Birmingham Mail Reports:

He and his wife went to Syria in 2014 to join ISIS, however the authorities failed to realise he had left and kept paying housing benefit into his account, according to  BBC News.

The couple received nearly £10,000 in taxpayers’ cash – all of which is thought to have ended up in IS hands.

Haddouchi was unable to take out the money in Raqqa, due to the lack of international banks.

The Manchester Bomber who deliberately attacked children and teenagers at an Ariana Grande concert had also claimed ample welfare–so much so that he was able to travel to and from Libya on a regular basis.

According to The Daily Telegraph:

Abedi was given at least £7,000 from the taxpayer-funded Student Loans Company after beginning a business administration degree at Salford University in October 2015.

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It is thought he received a further £7,000 in the 2016 academic year even though by then he had already dropped out of the course. Salford University declined to say if it had informed the Student Loans Company that Abedi’s funding should have been stopped.

Separately, the Department for Work and Pensions refused to say if Abedi had received any benefits, including housing benefit and income support worth up to £250 a week, during 2015 and 2016. It would only say he was not claiming benefits in the weeks before the attack.

Another Jihadist who plotted 30 terror attacks owned two council houses.

The Sun found:

Terrorist Abid conned his way into getting the two council flats by claiming his wife needed her own home because she “wanted her independence.”

He hired lawyers to successfully demand a second taxpayer-funded home.

He then managed to get more public money by claiming cash to be wife Juwayriyah Noor’s full-time carer because she was suffering “stress and depression” — even though his flat was a 20-minute drive from hers.

When details of the two homes emerged at Abid’s trial he said: “We are not legally obliged to live together.” Abid, 27, is the latest in a long line of jihadis who happily exploit benefits provided by a system they profess to despise.

There are several other cases of Britain’s generous welfare system being exploited by radicals.

At a time where those who hold dissident views are barred entry into the country and thousands of veterans are effectively homeless, the British government’s priorities have been under fire.

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