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New York Times Refuses to Release Documents Proving Claims of Trump's Tax Avoidance

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The New York Times is refusing to release documents they say prove President Trump paid no personal federal income taxes for 10 of the past 15 years. The President and his attorneys have aggressively denied the allegation.

The Times reported Sunday that the President paid just $750 in federal income taxes the year he won the presidency and another $750 the first year he was in the White House. They go on to say the reason he paid no taxes at all for 10 of the past 15 years was because he lost more money than he made.

Alan Garten, an attorney for the Trump Organization, vehemently denied – both to The New York Times and publicly – the accusation the President paid little or no taxes over the past 15 years.

The New York Times’ story is riddled with gross inaccuracies. Over the past decade the President has paid tens of millions of dollars in personal taxes to the federal government,” Garten said in a statement. “While we tried to explain this to The Times, they refused to listen and rejected our repeated request that they show us any of the documentation they purport to be relying on to substantiate their claims.”

The Times wrote that they had obtained “tax-return data” that covered the past 15 years that included information on “the hundreds of companies that make up his business organization.” They openly admit, however, that their data does not include his personal returns for 2018 or 2019.

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The Times threatened “additional articles” in the coming weeks.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1310587468731879431

The New York Times story comes on the heals of a US Supreme Court decision considered a victory for the President.

The High Court issued a consolidated ruling that declined cases to issue definitive rulings on whether congressional committees can gain access to the President’s financial records, tossing the issue back to lower courts.

In each of the House cases, a congressional committee had subpoenaed records from financial institutions, including the accounting firm Mazars USA, Deutsche Bank, and Capital One, all of which have financial records related to President Trump and his businesses, less his personal tax returns.

“Without limits on its subpoena powers, Congress could ‘exert an imperious control’ over the Executive Branch and aggrandize itself at the President’s expense, just as the Framers feared,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote in the majority opinion.

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About the Author:
Frank Salvato is the co-host of the Underground USA podcast and host of the National File podcast RightMinded. His writing has been recognized by the US House International Relations Committee and the Japan Center for Conflict Prevention, and has been published by The American Enterprise Institute, The Washington Times, Accuracy in Media, and Breitbart. Mr. Salvato appeared on The O'Reilly Factor on FOX News Channel and is the author of six books examining internal and external threats facing our country. He can be heard twice weekly on “The Captain’s America: Third Watch” radio program syndicated nationally on the Salem Broadcasting Network and Genesis Communications affiliate stations.




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